Spills Aren't Slick - A Campaign of the Pacific Oil Spill Prevention Education Team

POSPET - Who, What, and Why

As part of Georgia Strait Alliance's presence at the 2007 Vancouver International Boatshow, SPILLS aren't SLICK information was readily available as a compliment to their Creating Cleaner Harbours Bilge Pad Kit distribution project.
As part of Georgia Strait Alliance's presence at the 2007 Vancouver International Boatshow, "SPILLS aren't SLICK" information was readily available as a compliment to their "Creating Cleaner Harbours" Bilge Pad Kit distribution project.

The Pacific Oil Spill Prevention Education Team, POSPET, evolved from the simple premise that small oil spills can add up to cause significant environmental and economic harm, and are a regional problem that can be remedied more effectively through collaborative projects drawing from existing talent and resources. For over a decade, POSPET has served as a forum for exchanging information and outreach ideas about prevention of oil spills and other boater best management practices while providing boat and marina operators with a consistent and accurate pollution prevention messages. POSPET members include representatives from state and federal agencies, industry associations, and nonprofit groups from Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, California, and nationwide.

POSPET encourages networking to exchange ideas and to help its members adopt innovative approaches, while avoiding inefficient replication and pitfalls in their respective pollution prevention programs. Through informal collaboration and access to beneficial member review and feedback, POSPET adds value and has improved the quality and reach of individual efforts.

POSPET also allows for the effective leveraging of resources. The cooperative spill prevention campaign that uses the "Spills Aren't Slick" message ensures the widest distribution of educational materials while saving all POSPET members on material, design and production costs.

POSPET has also been instrumental in promoting an easy-to-remember phone number to encourage spill reporting. The 1-800-OILS-911 number can be called from anywhere in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, or California, and the reporting of an oil spill is automatically routed to the correct emergency response dispatch center in any of those jurisdictions. The Pacific States/BC Oil Spill Task Force provides staff support for POSPET and maintains this innovative spill reporting number.

read more (pdf file 31kb)


PDF files for the Spills Aren't Slick materials
A Spills aren't Slick sign posted at Port Townsend Marina in Washington.
A Spills aren't Slick sign posted at Port Townsend Marina in Washington.

These PDF files provide the graphics for the Spills Aren't Slick signs and decals which are distributed by POSPET members. Credit for the design goes to Tom Leonard, Graphic Designer for the Washington Department of Ecology. The official POSPET signs are printed on 11" x 18" poly-plastic, fade resistant material for posting outdoors at boat ramps and marinas, but if you wish to reprint for indoor use, please do so. Please note that the spill reporting numbers on the decals differ for British Columbia/Washington waters and Oregon/California waters.

Poster (pdf file 24kb)
Decal for Canada (pdf file 56kb)
Decal for U.S. (pdf file 56kb)
Fuel Pump Tags (pdf file 508kb)
Brochure (pdf file 1.2 MB)


1-800-OILS-911
Washington Department of Ecology NW Regional Office employees promote OILS 911.
Washington Department of Ecology NW Regional Office employees promote OILS 911.


The Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force has supported the 1-800-OILS-911 spill reporting number for the "unregulated" community, such as recreational boaters and marinas, since 1999. The number is promoted through POSPET's Spills Aren't Slick campaign. It's an easy number to remember and can be used along the West Coast from British Columbia to California. When a boater calls this number it automatically rolls into the emergency office for the jurisdiction where the call originates. Below are the usage numbers by jurisdiction for 1999-2010.

  Oregon BC WA Calif.
1999 9 17 28 187
2000 7 21 19 159
2001 11 19 29 97
2002 4 10 19 113
2003 5 8 42 107
2004 9 19 141 238
2005 12 16 84 214
2006 7 21 120 210
2007 15 13 138 298
2008 10 17 151 258
2009 12 22 131 206
2010 11 11 151 202


1-800

Check out the Official Sea Shanty of the Georgia Strait Alliance's Bilge Pad Project:
http://www.georgiastrait.org/?q=node/767

A POSPET Featured Program
POSPET provides a forum for members to exchange information on successful outreach and education efforts. Oregon's Clean Marina and Clean Boater Programs are another outstanding example of what POSPET members are accomplishing.

The Oregon State Marine Board's Clean Marina Program reached a milestone in 2011, with the certification of the 50th facility on June 30, 2011. The "Clean Marina" designation is a testament to these 50 marinas' efforts to do their part in keeping Oregon's waterways pollution-free. The first Marina certified in the Clean Marina program was Rocky Point Marina, in Scappoose, in 2006. In Oregon, there are approximately 200 facilities eligible for the Clean Marina Program.

The Oregon Clean Marina program is a voluntary program working to protect and improve local water quality by promoting the usage of environmentally sensitive practices at marinas. The Clean Marina program recognizes marinas, boatyards, yacht clubs, and floating home moorages that establish and promote a cleaner marine environment in Oregon. "It would be so amazing to have every marina participate in the program," says Rachel Bullene, Clean Marina Coordinator for the Marine Board. "Being certified benefits the facility, the people who use the facility, and ultimately, Oregon's waterways for future recreation and commerce."

If a facility is in compliance with existing environmental regulations and uses a high percentage of the recommended best management practices, it can be designated as an Oregon Clean Marina. Such certified marinas are authorized to fly the Clean Marina flag and use the logo in their advertising. The flag and logo are signals to boaters that a marina cares about the quality of Oregon's waterways.

Map of Certified Oregon Clean Marinas:


Being a part of program has other benefits. The facility receives detailed information and tools to eliminate or reduce pollutants- such as oil, paint, cleaning chemicals, sewage, fish waste, and trash - from contaminating our waterways.

To learn more about the Oregon Clean Marina Program and the 50 certified Clean Marinas, visit http://www.boatoregon.com/OSMB/Clean/clean_marina.shtml.

Oregon's Clean Boater Program
Oregon is renowned for its majestic, clean and sparkling waterways and we know boaters want to do their part to keep them that way. Even though a single boat might be only a small source of pollution, the cumulative effects of tens of thousands of boats can have a significant impact on the environment. That's why the Oregon State Marine Board created the Clean Boater Program, which provides boaters the tools they need to prevent pollution and keep our waters clean. An Oregon Clean Boater is one who pledges to:
  • Practice proper fueling techniques or ask fuel dock attendants to do so;
  • Use oil absorbent materials in bilge areas when needed;
  • Use sewage pump-out facilities, floating restrooms, or land based facilities;
  • Use phosphate-free, biodegradable, and non-toxic cleaners;
  • Recycle when containers are available;
  • Dispose of fish waste properly;
  • Keep Oregon waters free of trash;
  • Help prevent the spread of invasive species - "Never Launch a Dirty Boat;"
  • Lead by example and encourage fellow boaters to take the pledge,
To say "thank you" to all the Oregon boaters that care about the environment and strive to adopt clean boating practices, the Marine Board has developed a recognition program to reward those boaters that take that extra step. Boaters first need to review the Marine Board publication "A Clean Boater's Guide - Protecting Oregon's Marine Resources." This booklet highlights all of the important practices boaters need to do to protect the environment when boating. Next, boaters sign the program pledge form. This is the official commitment to follow the guidelines outlined in the guidebook. Finally, the boater completes the brief environmental questionnaire. The Marine Board is using this data to gauge the baseline awareness of boaters about environmental topics. The results of the data will help the Marine Board develop education and outreach methods that focus on areas where it's needed.

Once the Marine Board receives the boater's pledge and questionnaire, we mail out the Clean Boater kit, which consists of a reusable tote bag, oil spill prevention materials (oil absorbent pillow w/instruction sheet, and Spills aren't Slick sticker and brochure), supplies to encourage sewage pump-out use (a laminated, statewide pump-out location reference sheet, hand sanitizer and a pair of non-latex gloves), as well as educational information to help boaters identify and prevent aquatic invasive species.

Boaters play an important role in ensuring that future generations can enjoy clean waterways. If you are an Oregon boater, apply online and join the Clean Boater Program today! Please go to: http://www.boatoregon.com/OSMB/Clean/boaterform.shtml

For more information regarding these programs, please contact:
Rachel Bullene, Oregon Clean Marina Coordinator
Oregon State Marine Board
(503) 378-2836
rachel.e.bullene@state.or.us

POSPET - Summary Notes

2013 Spring Meeting: March 29th, 2013,
Seattle Central Public Library
Read more (pdf file 152 kb)

2012 Spring Meeting: March 15th, 2012,
Hosted by the Washington Department of Ecology, Lacey, WA
Read more (pdf file 528 kb)

2011 Fall Meeting: October 13th, 2011,
Hosted by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Portland, OR
Read more (pdf file 422 kb)

2011 Spring Meeting: April 7th, 2011,
hosted by the Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 479 kb)

2010 Fall Meeting: October 27th, 2010,
hosted by the Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 504 kb)

2010 Spring Meeting: April 28th, 2010,
hosted by the Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 552 kb)

2009 Fall Meeting: September 30, 2009,
hosted by the Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 436 kb)

2009 Spring Meting: March 17th, 2009,
hosted by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
Read more (pdf file 164 kb)

2008 Fall Meeting: October 7th, 2008,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 1.2 MB)

2008 Spring Meeting: March 20th, 2008,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 56kb)

2007 Fall Meeting: October 16, 2007,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 64kb)

2007 Spring Meeting: March 29, 2007,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 128kb)

2006 Fall Meeting: October 12, 2006,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 72kb)

2006 Spring Meeting: March 9, 2006,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
Read more (pdf file 63kb)

2005 Fall Meeting: October 11, 2005,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
read more (pdf file 106kb)

2005 Spring Meeting: April 1, 2005,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
read more (pdf file 78kb)

2004 Fall Meeting: October 19, 2004,
hosted by Washington Department of Ecology
read more (pdf file 94kb)

POSPET - Members' Contact Information
POSPET Members (pdf file 246kb)

POSPET Member Organizations

Boating Clean and Green California Coastal Commission California Department of Boating and Waterways Cook Inletkeeper Oregon Dept Environmental Quality
Georgia Strait Alliance Oregon Clean Marina Oregon State Marine Board Pacific Marine Fisheries Commission Puget Sound Keeper Alliance

Washington Department of Natural Resources
Sea Grant Washington U.S. Coast Guard SeaPartners Washington State Department of Ecology Washington Department of Natural Resources

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